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April Deals: $100 off Starter, 50% off Aquinas, and Free Books!

April is here and with it comes great deals on resources to help you study Scripture and Tradition. Here’s this month’s roundup of savings you won’t want to miss.

Reflect on the resurrection with Easter deals

We’ve pulled together dozens of resources to guide your reflection throughout Eastertide. Contemplate the significance of the resurrection of Christ with works from  the Classics of Western Spirituality Bundle (126 vols.). The complete collection is 25% off for a limited time. And, don’t miss The Works of Thomas Aquinas (18 vols.) at more than 50% off!

Those are just two of the deals we’re featuring this Easter season. Don’t wait—they’re only available for a limited time. View all Easter deals now.

Get Verbum 7 Starter for under $200

Also for a limited time, grab Verbum 7 Starter for $100 off! That means right now you have rare opportunity to own a complete set of study tools and a library that’s perfect for deepening your understanding of Scripture.

Starter comes with the Catechism and a library of more than 110 titles, including the works by the early church fathers and Aquinas’ Summa Theologica. Plus, it includes powerful tools like Bible Word Study and the Passage Guide.

This deal expires on April 30, so don’t wait! Get $100 off Verbum 7 Starter while you still can.

April’s biggest deals

April’s monthly sale includes dozens of resources from the church fathers and other masters of Western spirituality. Don’t miss the top 5 biggest discounts from this month’s sale:

  1. 60% off The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin Catherine of Siena: Explore the legacy of the great Dominican mystic with this collection of her treatises.
  2. 50% off The Major Works of Anselm of Canterbury (4 vols.): Study the works that established Anselm as the father of scholastic theology.
  3. 50% off The History of St. Catherine of Siena and Her Companions: This introduction to St. Catherine includes a translation of one of her lesser known yet still powerful works.
  4. 40% off The Medieval Preaching and Spirituality Collection (34 vols.): This riveting collection of sermons features some of the richest spiritual writing of any time.
  5. 25% off Fathers of the Church: Fathers of the Post-Nicene Era (14 vols.): Essential works by Gregory the Great, Andrew of Caesarea, John of Damascus, and other post-Nicene fathers come together in this expansive collection.

New in Verbum Now

With Verbum Now, you’ll have the latest tools for studying Scripture and Tradition, but also receive exclusive perks like free preview resources and special deals only available to Now members.

This month, Now members get month-long, full access to T&T Clark Studies in Early Christianity and 40% off the Jewish Origins Collection (13 vols.).

Plus, Verbum Now members can pick a free book from a list of over 1,000 titles. If you’re a Now member, use coupon code NOWFREEBOOKAPR2018 at checkout to claim your book for free.

Not a member? Start your membership today to receive these and many other benefits.

Free Book of the Month

Throughout April, anyone can get the the Clementine Vulgate for free. Commissioned by Pope Damasus I, Jerome’s Vulgate rapidly became the standard version of the Bible in the West and remained so for centuries.

Plus, add the Lexham Reverse Interlinear Vulgate: New Testament for just $1.99, and the Lexham Reverse Interlinear Vulgate: Old Testament for just $2.99.

Get all three now.

What March Has to Offer You

Every month you’ll find multiple ways to save on Verbum resources, which means more ways to get resources in your library for deeper study.

Here are four sales and promotions running this March.

1. Monthly sale—save up to 50%

Browse deals on nearly two dozen resources, including:

Browse more sale items now.

2. Verbum Now

Verbum Now subscribers receive discounts and previews of Verbum resources every month, plus a free book. Subscribe to Verbum Now to take advantage of these deals:

3. Free Book of the Month

Get this month’s free book, and add a second for just $1.99:

  • Light in Darkness: Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Catholic Doctrine of Christ’s Descent into Hell — FREE (normally $34.99)

    The first comprehensive treatment of Balthasar’s theology of Holy Saturday, this book draws on the multiple yet unified resources of authoritative Catholic teaching to challenge Balthasar’s conclusions on Christ’s descent into hell.

  • Will Many Be Saved?: What Vatican II Actually Teaches and Its Implications for the New Evangelization — $1.99 (normally $19.99)

    The much-debated question of whether and how people who have not had the chance to hear the gospel can be saved goes back to the beginnings of Christian reflection. In Will Many Be Saved? Ralph Martin focuses primarily on the history of debate and the development of responses to this question within the Roman Catholic Church.

  • 4. Pre-Pub

    Verbum’s Pre-Publication program is how we add new books to our ever-growing catalog. You pre-order books to let us know which resources to invest in, and we give you special discounts in return. Once enough people pre-order a particular resource, we’ll start developing it for use in Verbum.

    This month’s featured Pre-Pub item is the What Are They Saying About… Series (16 vols.), which surveys recent scholarship about biblical books or themes. Respected authors and theologians such as Mark Allan Powell, Daniel J. Harrington, Donald Senior, and Warren Carter examine issues ranging from the authorship and date of biblical texts to Catholic teaching on environmental theology, the nature of the Trinity, liberation and feminist theologies, and the historical Jesus.

    Learn more or pre-order the series.

    Special Savings on Fathers of the Church

    Verbum Sales Associate Preston Morrison talks about his favorite Verbum resource, the Fathers of the Church Series from Catholic University of America in 127 volumes—now with extra savings through the end of the month!

    Preston says:

    I love Fathers of the Church because I can actually see what the Church Fathers taught and thought. From a scholarly perspective, I can read the Christian writers who came immediately after Christ. I grew up in a different faith tradition, and I didn’t even know the Church Fathers existed until recently!

    The sheer size of the series is most impressive: 46,317 pages of text in 127 volumes. Also, the translations from the original languages are fairly recent, with introductions and notes for each author.

    Fathers of the Church Series is at the top of my list because I haven’t found any other resource that compares to the quality of translations, number of authors, and comprehensive coverage of Christian writings for the first 500 years of Christianity.

    I find that this series is popular with customers across denominations, and they love it! Once you realize how much content you’re getting, it’s practically a must-own resource.

    For a limited time, you can save over $500 on the Fathers of the Church Series as part of the Verbum Monthly Sale. Don’t miss out—the sale ends July 1!

    Fathers of the Church

    Learn more about the Bible!

    The Bible is the inspired word of God, and this month, Verbum features one of the most up-to-date and scholarly study Bibles available: The Catholic Study Bible, 2nd edition. Along with essays and notes by world-renowned scholars on the writing, history, and interpretation of Scripture, Verbum’s amazing functionality links you in with commentaries and resources of your choice on each page. You can save even more when you make your purchase part of a new library!

    Fr. Daniel Harrington notes that the Catholic mass has included more Scripture since Vatican II:

    Since Vatican II the Bible has become prominent not only in Catholic liturgy and education but also in popular piety. The revised prayers for the sacraments and other liturgical actions use biblical language almost entirely. Charismatic groups and base communities have found biblical reflection and prayer to be the source of great spiritual energy. Even traditional Catholic observances like the Rosary are (and always have been) thoroughly biblical. The language of Catholic prayer in almost every instance derives from the Bible.

    …Catholic theology since the Council gives far more attention to biblical sources and is likely to express itself more in biblical than in philosophical language. Official church documents on theological matters or current problems almost always begin from Scripture and try to ground their arguments in biblical texts. The Catholic Church today is far more biblical than it was in the mid-1950s (18-9, emphasis added).

    Take advantage of the special features of Verbum that enhance your study with the Catholic Study Bible, on sale through the end of the month as part of our Easter Sale.

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    New to Verbum? Learn more about our powerful Catholic study tools.

     

    Fulfilled in Christ by Fr. Devin Roza: Enjoy Easter Savings!

    Last week, Fr. Devin presented a wonderful video demonstration on “The Last Seven Words of Jesus” using Verbum 6, and throughout the month of April, Fr. Devin’s book Fulfilled in Christ will be featured on Verbum’s Easter Sale!

    Fulfilled in Christ explains typology, one of oldest and most important aspects of salvation history. This book has received many accolades; well-known Catholic author Scott Hahn has this to say in his Foreward:

    Importantly, Fr. Roza’s book is quite timely. We are experiencing a call for a renewed emphasis on mystagogy in liturgy and catechesis…

    Adult education and RCIA groups will encounter here a rich treasure trove where they can dive into the profound meaning of the sacraments as a real participation in the mysteries of Christ. Catechists and scholars will find a comprehensive and yet succinct volume which makes accessible the beauty of the Church’s typological and symbolic understanding of the sacraments, including carefully chosen and compelling excerpts from Church Fathers.

    But the appeal of this book is not limited to those working with adult education or RCIA. Pastors will appreciate the fascinating connections between sacraments and Scripture that lend themselves to liturgical preaching. The summaries of the texts referenced are organically organized and theologically solid, allowing even a beginner in the faith to grasp the coherence and completeness of God’s plan of salvation and to investigate on their own.

    Typological interpretation is especially appropriate today, when so many people have lost the sense of mystery in their faith. Catholics who begin to dig deep into the typology of the sacraments will encounter the mystery of our life in Christ. Fr. Roza’s study restores us to the mystery that is at the heart of our faith: the mystery of God’s love as it plays out in human history, recorded in the Bible. As Pope Benedict states:

    Mystery is the heart from which our power comes and to which we return to find this center. For this reason I believe that catechesis that we might call mystagogical is very important. Mystagogical also means realistic, referring to our life as people of today. If it is true that the human being’s ‘measuring stick’ for what is just and what is not lies not within but without, in God, it is important that this God is not distant but recognizable, concrete, and that he enter our life and truly be a friend with whom we can speak and who can speak with us.(Lenten Meeting with the Clergy of the Rome Diocese, 2009)

    This is the God who came down from heaven to be with us, to be our intimate friend. In bringing to life the prefiguring of the sacraments, Fr. Roza’s complete and accessible book offers a fresh, invigorating means of reading the Scriptures which was present from the earliest Christians—indeed, even Jesus himself—and which is of vital interest to believers today.

    See all of the deals on the Easter sale!

    fulfilled-in-christ-the-sacraments-a-guide-to-symbols-and-types-in-the-bible-and-tradition

     

    St Thomas Aquinas on Knowing God

    We hope you have enjoyed our introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas throughout January’s Verbum Monthly Sale!

    Let’s close with a few of Aquinas’ thoughts on knowing God, from the beginning of his masterpiece, Summa contra Gentiles:

    That certain divine truths wholly surpass the capability of human reason, is most clearly evident. For since the principle of all the knowledge which the reason acquires about a thing, is the understanding of that thing’s essence, because according to the Philosopher’s teaching the principle of a demonstration is what a thing is, it follows that our knowledge about a thing will be in proportion to our understanding of its essence. Wherefore, if the human intellect comprehends the essence of a particular thing, for instance a stone or a triangle, no truth about that thing will surpass the capability of human reason.

    But this does not happen to us in relation to God, because the human intellect is incapable by its natural power of attaining to the comprehension of His essence: since our intellect’s knowledge, according to the mode of the present life, originates from the senses: so that things which are not objects of sense cannot be comprehended by the human intellect, except in so far as knowledge of them is gathered from [the senses]. Now [things we grasp from the physical senses] cannot lead our intellect to see in them what God is, because they are effects unequal to the power of their cause. And yet our intellect is led by [sense experiences] to the divine knowledge so as to know about God that He is, and other such truths. Accordingly some divine truths are attainable by human reason, while others altogether surpass the power of human reason ( 1, 5).

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    Jacobs Ladder by Jacques Stella, 1650.

    This is the last day to enjoy these special savings!

     

    Celebrate the Feast Day of St. Thomas Aquinas

    On the feast day of  St. Thomas Aquinas, we will feature him in his own words! Here is this Sunday’s gospel reading from Mark:

    And they went into Caperna-um; and immediately on the sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught. And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit;  and he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are, the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching! With authority he commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” And at once his fame spread everywhere throughout all the surrounding region of Galilee (Mk 1:21-28).

    To demonstate the tremendous scope of his erudition, we excerpt the Catena Aurea: Commentary on the Four Gospels. St. Thomas Aquinas’ masterful treatment of this same passage includes the works of the early church fathers, as well as scripture:

    BEDE. (in Marc. i. 7) Since by the envy of the devil death first entered into the world, it was right that the medicine of healing should first work against the author of death; and therefore it is said, And there was in their synagogue a man, &c.

    PSEUDO-CHRYSOSTOM. (Vict. Ant. e Cat. in Marc.) The word Spirit is applied to an Angel, the air, the soul, and even the Holy Ghost. Lest therefore by the sameness of the name we should fall into error, he adds, unclean. And he is called unclean on account of his impiousness and far removal from God, and because he employs himself in all unclean and wicked works.

    AUGUSTINE. (de Civ. Dei, ix. 21) Moreover, how great is the power which the lowliness of God, appearing in the form of a servant, has over the pride of devils, the devils themselves know so well, that they express it to the same Lord clothed in the weakness of flesh. For there follows, And he cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus of Nazareth, &c. For it is evident in these words that there was in them knowledge, but there was not charity; and the reason was, that they feared their punishment from Him, and loved not the righteousness in Him.

    BEDE. (ubi sup.) For the devils, seeing the Lord on the earth, thought that they were immediately to be judged.

    PSEUDO-CHRYSOSTOM. (Vict. Ant. e Cat. in Marc.) Or else the devil so speaks, as if he said, ‘by taking away uncleanness, and giving to the souls of men divine knowledge, Thou allowest us no place in men.’

    THEOPHYLACT. For to come out of man the devil considers as his own perdition; for devils are ruthless, thinking that they suffer some evil, so long as they are not troubling men. There follows, I know that thou art the Holy One of God.

    PSEUDO-CHRYSOSTOM. (Vict. Ant. e Cat. in Marc.) As if he said, Methinks that Thou art come; for he had not a firm and certain knowledge of the coming of God. But he calls Him holy not as one of many, for every prophet was also holy, but he proclaims that He was the One holy; by the article in Greek he shews Him to be the One, but by his fear he shews Him to be Lord of all.

    AUGUSTINE. (ubi sup.) For He was known to them in that degree in which He wished to be known; and He wished as much as was fitting. He was not known to them as to the holy Angels, who enjoy Him by partaking of His eternity according as He is the Word of God; but as He was to be made known in terror, to those beings from whose tyrannical power He was about to free the predestinate. He was known therefore to the devils, not in that He is eternal Life, but by some temporal effects of His Power, which might be more clear to the angelic senses of even bad spirits than to the weakness of men.

    PSEUDO-CHRYSOSTOM. (Vict. Ant. e Cat. in Marc.) Further, the Truth did not wish to have the witness of unclean spirits; wherefore there follows, And Jesus threatened him, saying, &c. Whence a healthful precept is given to us; let us not believe devils, howsoever they may proclaim the truth. It goes on, And the unclean spirit tearing him, &c. For, because the man spoke as one in his senses and uttered his words with discretion, lest it should be thought that he put together his words not from the devil but out of his own heart, He permitted the man to be torn by the devil, that He might shew that it was the devil who spoke.

    THEOPHYLACT. That they might know, when they saw it, from how great an evil the man was freed, and on account of the miracle might believe.

    BEDE. (ubi sup.) But it may appear to be a discrepancy, that he should have gone out of him, tearing him, or, as some copies have it, vexing him, when, according to Luke, he did not hurt him. But Luke himself says, When he had, cast him into the midst, he came out from him, without hurting him. (Luke 4:35) Wherefore it is inferred that Mark meant by vexing or tearing him, what Luke expresses, in the words, When he had cast him into the midst; so that what he goes on to say, And did not hurt him, may be understood to mean, that the tossing of his limbs and vexing, did not weaken him, as devils are wont to come out even with the cutting off and tearing away of limbs. But seeing the power of the miracle, they wonder at the newness of our Lord’s doctrine, and are roused to search into what they had heard by what they had seen. Wherefore there follows, And they all wondered &c. For miracles were done that they might more firmly believe the Gospel of the kingdom of God, which was being preached, since those who were promising heavenly joys to men on earth, were shewing forth heavenly things and divine works even on earth. For before (as the Evangelist says) He was teaching them as one who had power, and now, as the crowd witnesses, with power He commands the evil spirits, and they obey Him. (1 John 5:20. John 17:3) It goes on, And immediately His fame spread abroad, &c.

    GLOSS. (non occ.) For those things which men wonder at they soon divulge, for out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh. (Mat. 12:24)

    PSEUDO-JEROME. Moreover, Capernaum is mystically interpreted the town of consolation, and the sabbath as rest. The man with an evil spirit is healed by rest and consolation, that the place and time may agree with his healing. This man with an unclean spirit is the human race, in which uncleanness reigned from Adam to Moses; for they sinned without law, and perished without law. (v. Rom. 5:14. 2:12) And he, knowing the Holy One of God, is ordered to hold his peace, for they knowing God did not glorify him as God, but rather served the creature than the Creator. (1:21.25) The spirit tearing the man came out of him. When salvation is near, temptation is at hand also. Pharaoh, when about to let Israel go, pursues Israel; the devil, when despised, rises up to create scandals.

    Be sure to take advantage of all the excellent St. Thomas Aquinas resources as we come to the close of January’s Verbum Monthly Sale!

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    Jesus Casting Out Demons, Strasbourg Cathedral

    Celebrate the Genius of St. Thomas Aquinas, Part 3

    The Verbum monthly sale features several valuable resources from St. Thomas Aquinas, leading up to his feast day, January 28th.

    Contemporary moral issues are considered by academics and experts in several fields from the Georgetown University Press Aquinas Studies Collection, specially priced through the end of January!

    aquinas-studies-collection

    This 4-volume set has been highly praised. Here’s a review of The Ethics of Aquinas, edited by Stephen J. Pope:

    [A] must have for every theology library and an invaluable resource for moral theologians, philosophers, and students alike. Pope has gathered some of the best Thomistic scholars and ethicists in Europe and America to contribute to this book.

    Horizons

    Included in the set is Aquinas on the Emotions, lauded by Jean Porter,  John A. O’Brien Professor of Theological Ethics at the University of Notre Dame:

    Diana Cates’ book thus fills a real need, offering us a comprehensive, reliable, and engagingly clear guide to Aquinas’ complex theory, firmly placed within the wider context of his thought. What is more, by comparing Aquinas’ account with that of central contemporary theories of the emotions, she draws Aquinas into our own conversations, where he proves to be a surprisingly illuminating interlocutor. This fine book makes an important contribution both to Aquinas studies and to contemporary religious ethics and moral philosophy, and it deserves, and I expect it to have, wide influence.

    Be sure to take advantage of the savings and add to your library now!

    Celebrate the Genius of St. Thomas Aquinas, Part 2

    The Verbum monthly sale is featuring several works of St Thomas Aquinas.

    Here’s an excerpt from Commentary on the Gospel of John: Chapters 1-5, part of the 8-volume set, Thomas Aquinas in Translation.

    Get a hint of the capacious and lucid intellect of St. Thomas in his Prologue to the Gospel of John:

    I saw the Lord seated on a high and lofty throne, and the whole house was full of his majesty, and the things that were under him filled the temple (Is. 6:1)

    These are the words of a contemplative, and if we regard them as spoken by John the Evangelist they apply quite well to showing the nature of this Gospel. For as Augustine says in his work, On the Agreement of the Evangelists: “the other  Evangelists instruct us in their Gospels on the active life; but John in his Gospel instructs us also on the contemplative life.”

    The contemplation of John is described above in three ways, in keeping with the threefold manner in which he contemplated the Lord Jesus. It is described as high, full, and perfect. It is high: I saw the Lord seated on a lofty throne; it is full: and the whole house was full of his majesty; and it was perfect; and the things that were under him filled the temple.

    As to the first, we must understand that the height and sublimity of contemplation consists most of all in the contemplation and Knowledge of God: “Lift up your eyes on  high, and see who has created these things” (Is. 40:26). A man lifts up his eyes on high when he sees and contemplates the Creator of all things. Now since John rose above whatever had been created—mountains, heavens, angels—and reached the Creator of all, as Augustine says, it is clear that his contemplation was most high. Thus, I saw the Lord. And because, as John himself says below (12:41), “Isaiah said this because he had seen his glory,” that is, the glory of Christ, “and spoke of him,” the Lord seated on a high and lofty throne is Christ.

    Now a fourfold height is height is indicated in this contemplation of John. A height of authority; hence he says, I saw the Lord. A height of eternity; when he says, seated. One of dignity, or nobility of nature; so he says, on a high throne. And a height of incomprehensible truth; when he says, lofty. It is in these four ways that the early philosophers arrived at the knowledge of God.

     

     

     

    Celebrate the Genius of St. Thomas Aquinas During the Month of January

    The Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas is January 28th, and Verbum is celebrating with sales on Aquinas texts and scholarship in the Verbum Monthly Sale.

    Here’s an excerpt from British Dominican scholar Aidan Nichols’ Discovering Aquinas: An Introduction to His Life, Work, and Influence:

    Aristotle had asked, fundamentally, two questions. What is reality like, and what are the rules of argument which get us from one conclusion about it to another? The first kind of question is answered in his Physics, Metaphysics and Ethics; the second in his logical writings, the Organon, a name we can paraphrase as ‘the philosopher’s tools of trade’. The latter had been percolating through, in dribs and drabs, for some time, but a logical rule is empty unless you have some content for it to deal with, and it was the philosophical and ethical writings that caused the stir. In them, the different kinds of things in the world around us, including man, are analysed in terms of general principles of being and action which all beings in different ways exemplify; happiness is said to be the goal of specifically human life; it is reached by the exercise of virtues which are ways of being at harmony with myself and my human environment. There is little in Aristotle about the divine, for the philosopher lacked the concepts both of creation and of the personal nature of God, even if he saw a place for an unmoved Mover to keep the whole cosmic process of coming-to-be and passing-out-of-being in operation.
    Thomas’s achievement was to integrate such naturalism into the traditional Christian vision of life which the earlier monastic theologians entertained. In the early Middle Ages theology had been by and large the spiritual theology practised in the monasteries. While issues of logic were beginning to exercise monastic minds (one thinks of St Anselm), and such ruminations on the fundamental grammar of theological discourse were even more at home in cathedral schools, the aim was predominantly (not least in Anselm) the expression of the prayerful orientation of man to God. Preferred theological themes were closely relevant to spiritual living: religious self-knowledge, one’s status as creature and sinner; the grace of Christ and how it heals from sin and raises up to share the life of God; the goal of earthly pilgrimage in the beatific vision, sitting down with the Trinity at the banquet of heaven in the celestial city. Monastic theology, so well described in Dom Jean Leclerq’s The Love of Learning and the Desire for God, included, as that title tells us, ardour for erudition. The same monastic milieux transmitted, after all, much of the pagan classical inheritance as well as the Church Fathers. It was Thomas’s conviction, evidently, that this programme could be taken much further. The naturalism of the pagans at their best—the thinking, both theoretical and practical, of the ‘good pagans’—could be textured into the fabric of Christian theology, without losing—and here is the point that Thomas’s more rationalist disciples in later centuries were in danger of forgetting—the spiritual and eschatological (in a word, the heavenly) orientation of theology itself (14-15).

    Apotheosis of St. Thomas Aquinas by Francis de Zurburan, 1631.

    Apotheosis of St. Thomas Aquinas by Francis de Zurburan, 1631.

     

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