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Check out these August deals

Check out August's deals!

The word August comes from the Latin augustus, which means consecrated or venerable. Certainly St. Augustine lived up to the meaning of his name. In honor of his legacy, we have a great discount on a St. Augustine collection this month. We also have many other resources to offer that are sure to satisfy your study needs. Don’t hesitate. See all the deals.

 Sacra Pagina New Testament Commentary Series (18 vols.)Sacra Pagina New Testament Commentary Series (18 vols.)

Embrace the “very soul of sacred theology” with this astounding Scripture study series. If you took advantage of last month’s free book, you can get an even deeper discount with dynamic pricing.
$379.99 Now $322.99
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T&T Clark Studies in Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation (4 vols.)T&T Clark Studies in Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation (4 vols.)

Whether you are just getting your feet wet with Bible study or you are a seasoned Scripture scholar, these resources will guide you along the next step of your studies.
$55.99 Now $43.99
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 Fathers of the Church: St. Augustine (30 vols.)Fathers of the Church: St. Augustine (30 vols.)

This collection features many never-before-translated editions of Augustine’s Latin writings as well as his beloved and most important works.
$659.99 Now $469.99
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Have pity on me, Lord, son of David

Jesus and the Canaanite Woman

This coming Sunday is the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time. To help you prepare for worship, consider these timeless insights from St. Jerome on Sunday’s Gospel reading.

15:21. And having gone out from there, Jesus withdrew to the district of Tyre and Sidon. He leaves his false accusers, the scribes and Pharisees, and goes to the district of Tyre and Sidon in order to cure the residents of Tyre and Sidon. But a Canaanite woman leaves her native land and cries out to procure healing for her daughter. Observe that this Canaanite daughter is healed in the fifteenth place.

15:22. “Have pity on me, Lord, son of David, my daughter is badly vexed by a demon.” She knew to call him “son of David” because she had already come forth from her land and had left the error of the Tyrians and Sidonians by a change of place and of faith. “My daughter is badly vexed by a demon.” I believe that the daughter of the Church refers to the souls of believers, which were badly vexed by a demon. They did not know the Creator and were worshiping stone.

15:23. He answered her not a word. [His silence was] due not to some sort of pharisaical arrogance or superciliousness of the scribes, but that he might not seem to be opposed to his own statement by which he had commanded: “Do not go into the way of the Gentiles and do not enter into the cities of the Samaritans.” For he was unwilling to give an occasion to his false accusers, and he was reserving the perfected salvation of the Gentiles for the time of his Passion and Resurrection.

15:23. And his disciples came and were asking him, saying: “Dismiss her, because she is calling out after us.” Even at that time the disciples did not know the mysteries of the Lord. They were either moved by compassion to make this request for the Canaanite woman (whom another evangelist calls a Syrophoenician), or they were longing to be free from her importunity, since she was calling out repeatedly, not as if for a kind physician, but for a harsh one.

15:24. “I was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” He is not saying that he was not also sent to the Gentiles, but that he was sent first to Israel. In that way the transference to the Gentiles would be just, since Israel did not receive the Gospel. He has expressly said: “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” Thus, on the basis of this passage, we can also understand the one wandering sheep of another parable.

15:25. But she came and worshiped him, saying. In the person of the Canaanite woman, we should admire the faith, patience, and humility of the Church: faith, by which she believed that her daughter could be healed; patience, by which she perseveres in prayer, after having been so often scorned; humility, by which she compares herself not with dogs but with puppies. Now, pagans are called dogs on account of their idolatry. They have surrendered themselves to the eating of blood, and by the bodies of the dead are carried off into madness. Note that this Canaanite woman with persistence first calls him son of David, then Lord, and finally she worships him as God.

15:27. But she said: “Yes, Lord, for even the puppies eat from the crumbs that fall from the table of their masters.” I know, she says, that I do not deserve the sons’ bread. I am incapable of taking whole food or of sitting at the table with the Father. But I am content with what is left over for the puppies, so that by the humility of crumbs I might come to the greatness of the whole loaf. Oh, what a marvelous transformation of things! Israel was once a son, and we were the dogs. The arrangement of the titles is changed due to the difference in faith. Of Israel it is later said: “Many dogs have surrounded me”; and: “Beware of the dogs, beware of the evil workers, beware of the mutilation.” But with the Syrophoenician woman and with the woman who flowed with blood, we have heard: “Great is your faith; let it be done to you according to your faith”; and: “Daughter, your faith has saved you.”

How might this scene with the Canaanite woman help us understand the relationship of Christianity with other religions? To dig deeper in your own devotional time, contemplate these verses in the Verbum Bible Study software. Or, if you don’t yet own it, request Jerome’s commentary—available this month at a special discount.

Jerome. (2008). Commentary on Matthew. (T. P. Halton, Ed., T. P. Scheck, Trans.) (Vol. 117, pp. 182–183). Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press.

Lord, save me!

Lord, save me.

This coming Sunday is the Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. We now continue our reflection of timeless insights from St. Jerome on Sunday’s Gospel reading.

14:30. But when he saw the strong wind, he was afraid, and, beginning to sink, he shouted out, saying: “Lord, save me!” The faith of his heart was burning, but human weakness dragged him into the depths. Therefore, he is abandoned for a little while in temptation, that his faith might increase and he might understand that he has been saved not by the easiness of a request but by the Lord’s power.
14:31. And Jesus at once stretched forth his hand and took hold of him and said to him: “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” Because the apostle Peter had grown a little afraid, Jesus said to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” Now we have spoken above about Peter’s faith and ardor of mind. It was he who had courageously asked the Savior, saying, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.”273 If this is so, what will Jesus say to us, who do not even have the smallest particle of this little faith?
14:33. Those who were in the boat came and worshiped him, saying: “Truly you are the Son of God.” At a single sign when the tranquility of the sea is restored, which normally happens after occasional heavy storms, the sailors and passengers confess that he is truly the Son of God; and yet in the Church Arius proclaims him to be a creature!

Peter made that leap of faith onto the water, but each step of the way was met with trepidation, and he began to sink. “Lord, save me,” he cried. We’ve all cried out like that before, desperately in need of God’s help, but God is always there, steadying us like an anchor. To dig deeper in your own devotional time, contemplate these verses in the Verbum Bible Study software. Or, if you don’t yet own it, request Jerome’s commentary—available this month at a special discount.

Jerome. (2008). Commentary on Matthew. (T. P. Halton, Ed., T. P. Scheck, Trans.) (Vol. 117, p. 176). Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press.

So Peter got out of the boat and walked on the water

He said,

This coming Sunday is the Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. To help you prepare for worship, consider these timeless insights from St. Jerome on Sunday’s Gospel reading.

14:22. And he compelled his disciples to get into the boat and to go ahead of him across the sea, until he dismissed the crowds. He ordered the disciples to cross the sea and he compelled them to get into the boat. By these words it is shown that they withdrew from the Lord unwillingly, since for love for their teacher they do not want to be separated from him even for a moment of time.
14:23. And when he had dismissed the crowd, he went up on a mountain alone to pray. If the disciples Peter, James, and John, who had seen the glory of the transfigured one, had been with him, perhaps they would have gone up on the mountain with him, but the crowd cannot follow to the heights. He can only teach them near the sea on the shore and feed them in the desert. Now it says that he went up alone to pray. You should refer this not to him who, from five loaves, satisfied five thousand men, not counting the women and children, but to him who, when he heard about the death of John, withdrew to a lonely place. It is not that we separate the person of the Lord, but that his works have been divided between his deity and his humanity.261
14:24. But the boat was being buffeted by the waves in the midst of the sea. It was right that the apostles departed from the Lord against their will and reluctantly. They did not want to suffer a shipwreck in his absence. Finally, while the Lord was delaying at the top of the mountain, at once a contrary wind arises and disturbs the sea. The apostles are in danger, and a shipwreck continues to be imminent, until Jesus comes.
14:25. But at the fourth watch of the night, he came to them, walking upon the sea. Guard duties and military watches are divided into intervals of three hours. So then, when he says that the Lord came to them at the fourth watch of the night, he is showing that they were in danger through the whole night. Then, at the end of the night and at the consummation of the world, he will bring help to them.
14:26. And when they saw him walking upon the sea, they were alarmed and said: “It is a ghost!” If, in accordance with Marcion and Manicheus, our Lord was not born of a virgin, but appeared as an imaginary representation, how is it that the apostles are now afraid that they are seeing a ghost?
14:26. And they cried out for fear. A confused outcry and uncertain voice is a sign of great fear.
14:27. And immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying: “Have courage; I am.” In the first place, this brings a remedy for what was the cause [of their fear]. He commands those who are afraid, saying: “Have courage,” do not fear. In the words that follow: “I am,” he is not adding who he is. For they could either have understood him from his voice, which was familiar to them and which was speaking through the misty darkness of the night; or they could have recalled that he was the one who they knew had spoken to Moses: “You are to tell this to the sons of Israel: He who is has sent me to you.”
14:28. But Peter responded and said: “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” In all passages Peter is found to be a man of an intensely burning faith. When the disciples are asked who men were saying Jesus is, Peter confesses him to be the Son of God. When the Savior wills to go to his Passion, Peter is unwilling that he whom a little earlier he had confessed to be the Son of God should die.266 I grant that Peter was in error on this matter, but the error was not in the affection he had. Peter goes up on the mountain with the Savior, as first among the first. And in the Passion, Peter alone follows.268 With bitter tears he immediately washed away the sin of denial into which he had fallen due to sudden fear. After the Passion, when they were fishing at Lake Genesareth, while the Lord was standing on the shore, the others were taking their time in sailing back. But Peter brooks no delay. He wraps himself with his garment and at once plunges headfirst into the waves.270 Therefore, with the same ardor of faith that he always has, now too, while the others are silent, he believes that by the will of his Master, he can do what Jesus was able to do by nature. “Command me to come to you on the water.” You give the command, and on the spot the water will grow solid, the body will become light, which in its own right is heavy.
14:29. And getting out of the boat, Peter walked on the water. Let those who think that the body of the Lord was not a true body because it went softly like air over the soft water answer how it was that Peter walked. Surely they are not going to deny that Peter was a true man.

This infamous scene of Jesus walking on the water has a way of encouraging us and confounding us in our faith. To dig deeper in your own devotional time, contemplate these verses in the Verbum Bible Study software. Or, if you don’t yet own it, request Jerome’s commentary—available this month at a special discount.

Jerome. (2008). Commentary on Matthew. (T. P. Halton, Ed., T. P. Scheck, Trans.) (Vol. 117, pp. 173–176). Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press.

Learn the true history of Genesis

Free Book of the Month

The Book of Genesis is a constant source of contention, especially with regard to its historical accuracy. This month’s free book will equip you with the knowledge you need to navigate conversations around this disputed topic. Learn how to debunk theories claiming that the Book of Genesis is only ancient history or even a myth. Then, even more importantly, learn how Genesis is a “blueprint for the rest of salvation history.”

Get the next book in the series for only $1.99. If you want to continue your exploration, then you will want to get Genesis Part II: God and His Family and learn how our faith family lineage traces back to Abraham.

These deals are only good through August 31get them both now!

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Verbum Now August Preview Resources

New in Verbum Now

For the month of August, Verbum Now members enjoy free access to:

T&T Clark Jesus Studies Collection (10 vols.)

For roughly 2,000 years the world has learned from the life and teachings of Jesus. The T&T Clark Jesus Studies Collection brings together a wide array of recent works exploring different aspects of Jesus’ life, humanity, and character. Jesus’ political and social message, his literacy and scope of knowledge, and his self-identification as the “son of man” are among the major issues scholars have been discussing for decades—and continue to discuss here. From the latest thoughts on the historical Jesus to a detailed discussion of each of the 60 recordings of Jesus’ emotions, this collection provides one of the most comprehensive examinations of Jesus in modern scholarship.


Verbum Now Exclusive Free Book

Every month Verbum Now customers get to choose a free book.

Choose a book from here, and use this coupon code: NOWFREEBOOKAUG

Save 40% Now on Last Month’s Preview Resources

For a limited time, Verbum Now members also enjoy discounts on the following resources, which were featured as a Verbum Now preview last month:

T&T Clark Studies in Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings (7 vols.)

 

Not yet a Verbum Now member? Join today to get these great benefits, access to all the latest Verbum features, and more!

 

Verbum Now July Preview Resources

New in Verbum Now

For the month of July, Verbum Now members enjoy free access to:

T&T Clark Studies in Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings (7 vols.)

This collection presents current research from world-renowned scholars on apocryphal and pseudepigraphal texts and their relevance for the study of Second-Temple Judaism, the New Testament, and early Christianity. Several volumes present the original-language texts and translations of these writings for primary source research and others offer in-depth analyses of their contents and relation to first-century Judaism and Christianity. Dig into the study of important texts like the Gospel of Thomas, the Parables of Enoch, the Testament of Job, and many more with these volumes.


Save 40% Now on Last Month’s Preview Resources

For a limited time, Verbum Now members also enjoy discounts on the following resources, which were featured as a Verbum Now preview last month:

T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint

Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9:1-18: An Intertextual and Theological Exegesis (2 vols.)

T&T Clark Studies in Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation (4 vols.)

 

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Verbum Now June Preview Resources

NewInVerbumNow

For the month of May, Verbum Now members enjoy free access to:

T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint

The T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint provides a cutting-edge survey of scholarly opinion on the Septuagint text of each biblical book. It covers the characteristics of each Septuagint book, its translation features, origins, text-critical problems and history. As such it provides a comprehensive companion to the Septuagint, featuring contributions from experts in the field.

Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9:1-18: An Intertextual and Theological Exegesis (2 vols.)

This investigation builds upon the study of Paul’s use of Scripture as it is understood from perspective of intertextuality. Brian Abasciano’s exegetical method combines a thorough traditional exegesis with a comprehensive analysis of Paul’s use of Scripture. He does this by reading Romans 9 in light of the Jewish interpretive traditions of the texts to which Paul alludes in Romans 9, placing great emphasis on analyzing the original contexts of the Old Testament texts Paul uses. Covering Romans 9:1–18, Abasciano’s exegesis also takes into account the epistle as a whole, especially the famous pericope of chapters 9 through 11.

T&T Clark Studies in Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation (4 vols.)

Taken out of context, the Bible is constantly misrepresented. Biblical theology searches for the Bible’s over-arching message and interprets individual sections of Scripture through that lens. T&T Clark Studies in Biblical Theology and Theological Interpretation provides stepping stones for those new to studies of biblical theology, and insightful commentaries for people familiar with theological interpretation. These texts give readers the intellectual tools to take on more advanced theological concepts and interpret Scripture for themselves. For those questioning the merits of studying ancient Scripture in our modern world, New Testament Theology and Its Quest for Relevance offers a much-needed answer. Together, these four books make one of the most accessible theological studies available.


Save 40% Now on Last Month’s Preview Resources

For a limited time, Verbum Now members also enjoy discounts on the following resources, which were featured as a Verbum Now preview last month:

Classic Studies on the Beatitudes (10 vols.)

 

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Verbum Now exclusive deals end soon

Verbum Now trial subscriptions for Faithlife TV for the month of May are about to end! Enjoy free Bible teaching, family entertainment, and community video streamed to your TV, computer, or mobile device.

Also, the Verbum Now exclusive coupon code for $50 off any purchase of $100 or more ends soon. Take advantage of it before the end of May. Just select the products you wish to purchase, make sure your cart total is over $100, and enter coupon code 50NOW at checkout.

Shipping Soon: Verbum Advanced Academic Training

On May 26 the Advanced Academic Training will begin shipping. Take advantage of the 50% pre-pub discount before time is out!

Verbum’s Advanced Academic Training builds on the Verbum 360 Training videos by taking a deeper look at an academic application of the software. Fr. Devin Roza, LC, is visiting Professor of New Testament at the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum, and Fr. Andrew Dalton, LC, is Professor assistant of New Testament at the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum. They guide you through the software—showing you where the tools live, how to use them, and examples of how they can be useful in your academic application.

You’ll learn advanced research techniques for studying Scripture in its original languages and historical context, and in the light of the rich Tradition of the Catholic Church. Dig deeper into the original languages, and investigate differences between translations. By the time you finish this video, you’ll feel comfortable finding scholarly answers to academic questions.

Get 50% off before it ships May 26!

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